Tag: review

The Breakup: 4 Albums You Must Listen To Get Over Them

Music Catalogs November 12, 2019

Before you read the article, let’s set a premise: whatever you’re going through, I hope you get through it with flying colors. Whatever goal you want to achieve, I hope you achieve it and rid of all things that kept you from achieving prior. When writing this article, I was going through a break-up. I’d say I’m still healing from it, but I’m in a much better place than I was. The albums I listed are personal, and what helped me move-on. I’m definitely in a much happier place, and I want anybody reading this to know to trust the process of healing. These albums hold a place in my heart because they helped me face emotions in a way I’d never consider before. So, turn the speakers up, cover yourself in a fuzzy blanket, eats a lot of ice cream, and enjoy.

Kehlani – While We Wait

Label: TSNMI / Atlantic
Release date: February 22th, 2019

Although this album chronicles how Kehlani’s relationship went from love at first sight to the dumpster, there’s lessons to be learned in her songs. Her lyrics recounting her experience are the centerpiece of the album. And if you listen closely, you’ll learn a thing or two. The greatest lessons comes at the expense of the most heart wrenching, twisted moments of Kehlani’s relationship. It comes at the climax of fighting on “Too Deep,” where Kehlani questions if fighting is worth staying in the relationship, and it comes when Kehlani makes her final resolution with her lover, respectfully recognizing issues in the relationship and departing ways on “Footsteps.”

This album alleviates break-up pain because it acts as a mirror, putting the reality of the situation in the listener’s face so they can go through heartbreak. The album makes you reflect. Every song offers a deeply nuanced, well-reasoned reflection that leads the listener to come up with their own conclusions about their relationship. Her songs bring up conclusions such as, “If you are questioning your worth, then it was the right thing for you to leave.” This albums gives you firm thought to help your break-up process go by faster.

Kiana Ledé – Selfless

Label: Republic
Release date: July 12th, 2018

After a breakup, it’s hard to realize who you are and what makes you happy. You can become full of resentment, despair, and loneliness that those feelings can take over you. You don’t want to lose yourself in the process of recovery. Selfless is an alternative option so those feelings won’t take you over: the opportunity to resonate with those feelings. Kiana’s lets the listener know, her reactions may as well be yours too. No you’re not insane, no you’re not crazy, and no you’re not irrational. Crying over the breakup doesn’t make you weak. Selfless allows the listener to find strength in their emotional turmoil so they can find comfort and move on. 

The album pushes the feelings of resentment, envy, and despair. In “Shame,” Kiana condemns her ex for being a better person with another lover than with her. On “EX” Kiana contemplates staying friends with her EX because she still loves him dearly (you know, those relationship withdrawal symptoms). This album doesn’t help you by giving you advice, but letting you recognize your feelings. It’s okay to be sad.

Frank Ocean – Blonde

Label: Boys Don’t Cry
Release date: August 20th, 2016

There is nobody better with words than Frank Ocean. He’s a Scorpio for christ-sake, emotional storytelling is his specialty! No one can evoke such strong emotions. His vivid imagery, poetic lyrics, and nostalgic breakup recountals evokes strong emotions that no other artist can bring to mind. His stories are taken to another level with the production and execution of his songs– Blonde steps away from the R&B we’ve come to know from the radio. It’s even a departure from the sounds of Channel Orange. The listener hears lush synths, honey-like guitar riffs, and beautiful piano-keys instead of percussion-heavy numbers. That type of sonic landscape encourages the listener to be transported. You’ll focus on the intense emotions and triumph heard on his songs. On “White Ferrari,” The precise synth lifts you up and caresses you in Frank Ocean’s words. You almost feel as if this is the sound of warmth and clouds until the guitar strums finally find its way to give the song a slow rhythm with Frank Ocean singing above it: “I care for you still and I will forever / That was my part of the deal, honest.” His lyrics get you more emotionally entangled in his story of love, commitment, and the comfort of it. 

Moments like White Ferrari exist everywhere on Blonde. Songs like “Solo” and “Self Control” make you think deeply. Blonde takes you to an intimate place that brings to mind tender and sentimental emotions, moving you on to reminiscence on the good moments. That washes out all the resentment as you begin your new chapter.

Ari Lennox – Shea Butter Baby

Label: Dreamville / Interscope
Release date: May 7th, 2019

Ari Lennox’s Shea Butter Baby celebrates independence so that the newly-heartbroken can embody liberation. Ari Lennox wants her listeners to triumph in their new environment. However, Ari lets listeners know that it isn’t always easy being alone. This will always happen on your journey. Emotions spill on the tracks “Whipped Cream” which entail Ari’s insecurities that broke her relationship. She sings about how she wishes she wasn’t jealous and so old. Although sad songs exist on Shea Butter Baby, they only reinforce the triumph Ari Lennox reaches post-relationship. The flavor of Shea Butter Baby hides within Ari Lennox’s successes with new found independence. On “New Apartment,” Ari has a place all to herself. She’s reached peak independence. The New Apartment represents being set free from the chains of a partner’s expectations and judgement. No more is Ari Lennox tied down. The number “BMO” is the sexual liberation anthem– literally, BMO stands for Break Me Out. Ari’s sexual freedom only came due to the breakup, but she embraces her sensuality.

Moments like these only could happen at the cost of a breakup, but it’s worthwhile and that’s the lesson Ari teaches on her debut. So, next time Shea Butter Baby plays, pop a bottle of champagne and make a toast to embarking on a new chapter in your life!

My Dear Melancholy,

Albums/EPs, New Music April 14, 2018
(Written by Miguel Anderson)

My Dear Melancholy, gives us a piece of what The Weekend once was, almost going back to the mystery man synonymous with Abel Tesfaye. This album uncovers the pop-facade that Abel has been hiding under and along the way, reveals secrets.

Since The Weeknd landed a spot as one of the biggest pop stars in recent history, his evolution from explicit R&B singer to pop star has been somewhat disastrous; dead ends and false hopes have pervaded his growth at almost every turn. This route started when he first popped up onto the scene with his three mixtapes that presented a bruised world surrounding themes of drug use, lustful experiences, and self-hate. Soon after this, false hopes start to appear on his debut, Kiss Land. It was a lackluster performance, considering that the Weeknd pursued a topic typical for a debut, as most of it revolved around the idea that fame changed things. Although his breakout produced some of his best work released as The Weeknd, like “Tell Your Friends,” it also produced his most pop-formulaic songs, such as “Can’t Feel My Face” and “In The Night.” Lastly, On Starboy, his persona fully transformed and so did his sound; it was now fully studded with an electro-R&B flair and this is where it suffered the most, a major pitfall for conforming to pop’s electronic infatuation.

Despite the disappointing change he made on StarboyMy Dear Melancholy, marks a move towards darker sounds and opens the door for a more vulnerable narrative, and in The Weeknd’s case, it marks a change for the better, a change that still manages to keep The Weeknd at his most interesting. The truth is that, The Weeknd didn’t soar to extraordinary heights on Starboy where he went full fledged into his newly refined R&B-electronic image. My Dear Melancholy, lets us know that the extraordinary heights that he put in place on Beauty Behind the Madness and in the Trilogy series are still in reach and the reaches towards those heights sound amazing on this album.

The Weeknd picks up where he left off on Beauty Behind The Madness, continuing to deliver his dark bruised world. However, what makes My Dear Melancholy, different is the fact that so much emotion and vulnerability is poured onto this breakup album. It sounds perfect for post-breakup sulk and relief, given that the album comes flooding with dark brooding synths and many pleas as he sulks in regret and realization. “Call Out My Name,” sets the scene for the album: The Weeknd is in a battle with himself, finding himself having to either indulge in past pleasures or move onto better things. He fights with his regrets, as he delivers several emotion packed punches and belts of notes, stating “You gave me comfort / But falling for you was my mistake,” over a sample of “Earned It,” that gathers intensity until he reaches his breaking point eventually pouring out: “So call out my name / Call Out my name when I kiss you so gently / I want you to stay.” “Try Me” sees Abel begging for acceptance after the two have parted ways; it may sound like a call to a fight, but it’s a call to home instead. He pleads with his ex to leave her current partner to “try him” one more time. Abel then moves past the relationship and accepts his regrets, sorrows, and states his goodbyes throughout the songs “Wasted Times,” “I Was Never There,” and “Privilege.” These three stand out as the most emotional in The Weeknd’s career and reintroduce his cloudy dark sound along with his vulnerable narrative. They embrace his past of substance abuse and his ominous production and you see Abel confront his feelings for the first time. “Wasted Times” sees The Weeknd starting to accept his regrets. Abel sings about substance abuse on “I Was Never There,” even acknowledging the use of it to ease the pain, stating “So, I posion myself again, again / ‘Til I feel nothing.” Finally, on “Privilege,” Abel states his goodbye by addressing the relationship first hand and how he is going to forget about it — he gives his action plan: “and I’ma fuck the pain away, and I know I’ll be okay,” coming to the conclusion that maybe love isn’t for him afterall.

Although My Dear Melancholy, is not a complete 180 turn around, nor so innovative as the Trilogy series, it does serve it’s justice putting him back right before his electro-studded Starboy, on the route where The Weeknd is at his most interesting. The outcome of it all is a cloudy emotional album that concludes that The Weeknd sounds best when he has experienced the worst.

Crush

Albums/EPs, New Music February 18, 2018

(Photo from Atlantic Records)

(Written by Ashley Flamenco)

Crush is the R&B romance-filled work of soulful singer Ravyn Lenae and executive producer Steve Lacy. The record was released right on time, just a few days before Valentine’s Day.  It’s the perfect music to listen to, not only on the Day of Love but, if you’re in an amorous mood or in your “feels.” The collection of love ballads include Ravyn’s wide-ranged vocals and Steve’s groovy instrumentals, running through all the different types of love and relationships one can have and the passionate emotions felt in each of them.

The EP begins with its first and only single, “Sticky,” a song centering around one being glued to and unable to step away from a partner who treats them badly. This is otherwise known as a toxic relationship, which Ravyn describes as “sticky-icky.” The track is introduced by a hooking glide of a keyboard that is eventually accompanied by lo-fi guitar riffs that are obviously the work of Steve Lacy. Containing a disco-esque vibe and high-pitched vocals, “Sticky” is the most upbeat song on the record.

“Closer (Ode 2 U)” describes the feelings of infatuation that often come before a relationship and displays what it’s like to crush hard on someone and may be referring to the innocent puppy love that is typically felt among adolescents. The track is joined by sensual sounding guitar and contains a lot of passionate “woooos” and “whys” where Ravyn questions why she feels this burning “love.”

“Computer Luv,” one of two songs on the EP that feature Steve’s vocals, is about an intimate online long-distance relationship; both partners long to see and be with each other but at the same time question whether their feelings are true since the two have yet to meet in person. The two sing “when will I meet you/ I’m down to see you/ I wanna see you right now” in unison — their yearning and desire for each other are felt deeply through the Ravyn and Steve’s soft and passionate singing. Ending off  “Computer Luv” is a heartfelt voicemail from Ravyn’s online lover.

Ravyn-Lenae-Main-Pub-Photo-Jingyu-Lin.jpg

Contrary to other tracks on the record that discuss relationships between two people, “The Night Song,” is a wonderful ode to the most important relationship: the relationship with yourself. It explores the fact that one’s happiness shouldn’t be relied upon someone else, as it explores being single and being content with oneself: “I wanna be no one but me/ And all I really need is my own company,” making “The Night Song” a sweet serenade to oneself.

The EP ends with “4 Leaf Clover,” where Ravyn and Steve sing back and forth to each other. The two converse, opening up about feelings of jealousy, fears of commitment and possibly ruining their close friendship. One partner trusts that a romantic relationship is meant to be between the them meanwhile, the other believes that it can only go wrong.

Whether you’re deeply infatuated with someone else or simply yourself, Crush, an affectionate work of art infused with passionate singing and funky yet amorous instrumentals, is a great record to listen to. And with both artists seemingly having similar visions with their sounds, Crush, although only consisting of 5 songs, has proven Ravyn Lenae and Steve Lacy to be a perfect duo.